Thursday, November 22, 2012

AMAZING UNSEEN FACES OF EARTH

GOODMORNINGMYFRIENDS


E-mail
AMAZING UNSEEN FACES OF EARTH





Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

The Bear Glacier on the Kenai Peninsula along the Gulf of Alaska seen by the


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Deep in the Sahara Desert lies this crater. Nearly a perfect circle, it is 


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Cloudless skies allowed a clear view of Tibet in mid-December 2008.
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying onboard
NASA's Terra satellite captured this true-color, imageon December 18, 2008.
Snow caps some mountain peaks, and ice partially covers some lakes in this
high-altitude region, nicknamed the "Roof of the World." (NASA/Jeff Schmaltz,
 MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center)


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Two cyclones are seen, after forming in tandem in November 2006.
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard NASA's
Terra satellite took this picture of the two cyclones south of Iceland on
November 20 (South is up in image). (NASA/Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory)


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth
8

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Roughly 480 by 320 kilometers, Dasht-e Lut is a large salt desert in
 southeastern Iran. This natural-color image, captured by the ASTER
 on NASA's Terra satellite shows part of the southeastern portion of
 Dasht-e Lut on May 13, 2006. This area consists of sand, and it contains
 some of the world's t
allest dunes, some reaching a height of 300 meters (1,000 feet).
9NASA/Jesse Allen, Earth Observatory,
 NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team)


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

During the last ice age, Canada's Akimiski Island was buried under several thousand
meters of ice, but since its retreat, the island has rebounded (risen in elevation) and new
 beach areas have emerged, streams and lakes have formed, and trees and other vegetation
have colonized the new territory. This image of Akimiski Island was captured by the Landsat 7
satellite on August 9, 2000.
(NASA/Jesse Allen, Landsat,University of Maryland's Global Land Cover Facility)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Steep Antarctic mountains channel the flowing ice sheet into a fast-moving river of ice
named Byrd Glacier located near McMurdo Station, the principal U.S. Antarctic Research Base.
 The glacier plunges through a deep, 15-mile-wide valley in the Transatlantic Mountains to
create a 100-mile-long, rock-floored ice stream. This image, captured by the Landsat 7 satellite
 on December 24, 1999, shows part of the Byrd Glacier flowing through the Transatlantic Mountains.
(Jesse Allen, Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica,LIMA)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

The Arabian Peninsula's Empty Quarter, known as Rub' al Khali, is the world's largest
 sand sea, holding about half as much sand as the Sahara Desert. The Empty Quarter covers
583,000 square kilometers(225,000 square miles), and stretches over parts of Saudi Arabia,
Yemen, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. The Enhanced Thematic Mapper on NASA's
 Landsat 7 satellite captured this image of the Empty Quarter on August 26, 2001
(NASA/Robert Simmon, Landsat,USGS)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

In mid-December 2005, the diminutive Amsterdam Island made waves - not in the Indian
 Ocean where it resides, but in the clouds overhead. The MODIS instrument aboard
NASA's Terra satellite captured this image on December 19, 2005. The island itself
 is almost too small see in this image, but it serves as the starting point for the clouds
that flow toward the northeast in a giant V shape. (NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land
Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC)


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

This highly detailed image from the Taiwanese Formosat-2 satellite shows the different
sizes, shapes, and textures of ice fragments from an ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula
 on March 8, 2008. Several large icebergs float amid a mosaic of smaller pieces of ice.
 The level of detail in the image is so great that it can seem as though you are standing
over a scale model made out of papier-mâché and foam blocks. The detail can make the bergs
seem deceptively small. In reality, some of the large bergs are several hundred meters (yards) long.
 (Formosat image © 2008 Dr. Cheng-Chien Liu, National Cheng-Kung University
and Dr. An-Ming Wu, National Space Organization, Taiwan)


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

This simulated natural-color image of southeastern Fars province in southern Iran shows
 a dry river channel carving through arid mountains toward the northeast. A broad belt of
 lush agricultural land follows the curve of the alluvial fan and stretches out along a road
 that runs parallel to the ridgeline. The valley-ward margin of the intensely green agricultural
 belt fades to dull green along streams (or irrigation canals). The image was captured by the
 Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's
Terra satellite on October 12, 2004.
 (NASA/Jesse Allen, NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Tropical Cyclone Billy, seen off the coast of Western Australia on December 25, 2008
 by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite. (NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS
 Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center)


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

This image shows a colorful bloom of phytoplankton throughout the Black Sea on June 4,
2008, along the southern coast near the Turkish cities of Sinop and Samsun. The natural-
color image was captured by the MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite.
 (NASA/MODIS Rapid Response Team)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

This image of forest in the northern Republic of Congo was captured on June 27, 2002,
 by the commercial satellite Ikonos. Dirt logging roads (orange lines) cross the center of
 the image. This image is one of hundreds of satellite images from commercial and NASA
satellites that scientists from the Woods Hole Research Center used to create a map of
 logging roads and forest disturbance across 4 million square kilometers of tropical African
 forests in the three decades proceeding 2003. (NASA /Jesse Allen, IKONOS, Nadine
 Laporte, Woods Hole Research Center)


Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Harrat Khaybar in Saudi Arabia contains a wide range of volcanic rock types and spectacular
 landforms, several of which are represented in this photograph taken by an astronaut abourd
 the International Space Station on March 31, 2008. Jabal ("mountain" in Arabic) al Qidr is
 built from several generations of dark, fluid basalt lava flows. Jabal Abyad, in the center
 of the image, was formed from a more viscous, silica-rich lava classified as a rhyolite. (NASA-JSC)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Two-toned dust plumes blew northward off the coast of Libya on October 26, 2007, as
the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite took this picture. While plumes in the
 west are beige, reminiscent of the Sahara's sands, the plumes in the east are distinctly darker.
 (NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

When Mount St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980, the north face of the mountain collapsed,
 and a massive avalanche of rock, mud, and volcanic debris thundered down the mountain.
this photograph, taken on October 28, 2008 by an astronaut aboard the International Space
 Station shows the scene nearly three decades after the eruption - the impact on the forest
in the blast zone still obvious. South of the mountain, lush green forests cover the landscape,
 while north of the mountain, vegetation remains sparse, particularly on higher elevations.
(NASA/JSC)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

Houses and streets in bustling Las Vegas, Nevada are seen in this image from the commercial
IKONOS satellite taken in September of 2004. (IKONOS image ©2004 GeoEye)

Amazing Unseen Faces of Earth

The setting sun glints off the Amazon River and numerous lakes in its floodplain in this
 astronaut photograph from August 19, 2008. About 150 kilometers of the Amazon is shown
 here, about 1,000 kilometers inland from the Atlantic Ocean. This image was acquired on
August 19, 2008 by the by the Expedition 17 crew of the International Space Station.
(NASA/JSC)



SMILE
BE HAPPY
HAVE A GREAT DAY

VISIT

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.